Oregon Laws on Notaries Public

Oregon laws on notaries public can be found in Chapter 194, Title 19 of Oregon Revised Statutes.  Pursuant to ORS § 194.315, the term of office of a notary public is four years commencing with the effective date specified in the notarial commission.

 

Pursuant to ORS § 194.315, a person appointed and commissioned as a notary public must:

  • (a) Be at least 18 years of age;
  • (b) Be a resident of this state or have a place of employment or practice in this state;
  • (c) Be able to read and write English;
  • (d) Not have been convicted of a felony or any crime involving fraud, dishonesty or deceit during the 10-year period preceding the date of application;
  • (e) Not have been convicted of:
  • (A) Acting as or otherwise impersonating a notary public as described in ORS 194.990 (1)(b);
  • (B) Obstructing governmental or judicial administration under ORS 162.235 (1)(b); or
  • (C) Engaging in the unlawful practice of law as described in ORS 9.160;
  • (f) Not have been found by a court to have:
  • (A) Practiced law without a license in a suit under ORS 9.166; or
  • (B) Engaged in an unlawful trade practice described in ORS 646.608 (1)(vvv);
  • (g) Not have entered into an assurance of voluntary compliance, pursuant to ORS 646.632, based on an alleged violation of ORS 646.608 (1)(vvv); [(e)]
  • (h) Not have had a commission as a notary public revoked during the 10-year period preceding the date of application; [(f)]
  • (i) Not be disqualified under ORS 194.340 to receive a commission; [(g)]
  • (j) Complete the course of study described in ORS 194.325; and [(h)]
  • (k) Have passed the examination required under ORS 194.325

The official seal of a notary public should be a stamp made of rubber or some other substance capable of making a legible imprint on paper in black ink.  The imprint must legibly reproduce under photographic methods.  Further, the Secretary of State should adopt rules prescribing the size and form of the imprint of the official seal to promote uniformity, legibility, and permanency.

 




Inside Oregon Laws on Notaries Public